<div dir="ltr"><div dir="ltr"><br></div><br><div class="gmail_quote"><div dir="ltr" class="gmail_attr">On Fri, Jan 7, 2022 at 6:25 PM hanneder--- via ntg-context <<a href="mailto:ntg-context@ntg.nl">ntg-context@ntg.nl</a>> wrote:<br></div><blockquote class="gmail_quote" style="margin:0px 0px 0px 0.8ex;border-left:1px solid rgb(204,204,204);padding-left:1ex"><br>
Probably the situation in South Asian Studies (Indology) is peculiar.<br>
As I indicated, there are mostly no  budgets for book typesetting in  <br>
Indology and<br>
I know of no real expert for typesetting in this field. In other  <br>
words, the authors<br>
have do it themselves, usually in Word etc., but some do use TeX etc.  <br>
Our publications<br>
series (Indologica Marpurgensia) is, for instance, all done with  <br>
LaTeX, as are my publications<br>
with Harrassowitz, which is the largest publisher in our field in  <br>
Germany. There is no institution<br>
offering typesetting of Sanskrit editions, because there is no  <br>
commercial interest in it and I<br>
think there is no expertise for this (especially when Indian scripts  <br>
are used instead of transliteration).<br>
<br>
Journals are different. Indological journals published by Brill use  <br>
TeX internally, which is convenient,<br>
but most others know only Word (->InDesign). That is the situation,  <br>
frustrating in a way, but it also<br>
gives some freedom for using TeX (and, sadly, creating one's own  <br>
dilettantic designs).<br>
<br>
Jürgen<br></blockquote><div><br></div><div>perhaps this can be interesting</div><div><a href="https://www.tatzetwerk.nl/">https://www.tatzetwerk.nl/</a><br></div><div>(seen them at a context meeting years ago)</div><div> </div></div><div><br></div>-- <br><div dir="ltr" class="gmail_signature">luigi<br></div></div>