<html><head>
<meta content="text/html; charset=UTF-8" http-equiv="Content-Type">
</head><body bgcolor="#FFFFFF" text="#000000"><br>
<blockquote style="border: 0px none;" 
cite="mid:CAJjcFnJuy6P7TtXiC+7jE_iJUhnJ-0COXv1_ksx9xdTOpFLVGQ@mail.gmail.com"
 type="cite">
  <div style="margin:30px 25px 10px 25px;" class="__pbConvHr"><div 
style="width:100%;border-top:2px solid #EDF1F4;padding-top:10px;">   <div
 
style="display:inline-block;white-space:nowrap;vertical-align:middle;width:49%;">
        <a moz-do-not-send="true" href="mailto:tim.steenvoorden@gmail.com" 
style="color:#485664 
!important;padding-right:6px;font-weight:500;text-decoration:none 
!important;">Tim Steenvoorden</a></div>   <div 
style="display:inline-block;white-space:nowrap;vertical-align:middle;width:48%;text-align:
 right;">     <font color="#909AA4"><span style="padding-left:6px">10. 
Februar 2018 um 12:44</span></font></div>    </div></div>
  <div style="color:#909AA4;margin-left:24px;margin-right:24px;" 
__pbrmquotes="true" class="__pbConvBody"><div dir="ltr">Thanks Otared! 
Works like a charm!<div><br></div><div>Out of curiosity, could you 
explain the mechanics behind this? I know it is a commonly used trick in
 TeX macro definitions, but I don’t know how it changes TeX’s 
understanding of the tokes it parses.</div></div></div>
</blockquote>
<br>
When you create a new commands like this<br>
<br>
    \def\mycommand[#1]{...}<br>
<br>
the brackets are delimiters for the argument of the command, i.e. when 
TeX sees<br>
\mycommand it looks for [ and grabs everything intill ] as as argument. 
When you<br>
out now a space (or start a new line) after ] in your definition of the 
command, e.g.<br>
<br>
    \def\mycommand[#1] {...}<br>
<br>
TeX looks now for “] ” (right bracket followed by a space) as delimiter 
for<br>
the argument of your command.<br>
<br>
Wolfgang<br>
</body></html>