<html>
<head>
<meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=utf-8">
</head>
<body style="word-wrap: break-word; -webkit-nbsp-mode: space; -webkit-line-break: after-white-space;" class="">
Indeed, the combination Amsterdam-Buitenveldert is the culprit.
<div class="">The solution therefore is to use (it is ConTeXt afterall) <font face="Courier" class="">Amsterdam|-|Buitenveldert</font>, then the word Amsterdam doesn't even needs an exception.</div>
<div class="">Thanks for the help.</div>
<div class=""><br class="">
<div apple-content-edited="true" class="">Hans van der Meer<br class="">
<br class="">
<br class="">
</div>
<div>
<blockquote type="cite" class="">
<div class="">On 07 Jul 2015, at 18:00, Pablo Rodriguez <<a href="mailto:oinos@gmx.es" class="">oinos@gmx.es</a>> wrote:</div>
<br class="Apple-interchange-newline">
<div class="">On 07/07/2015 05:41 PM, Arthur Reutenauer wrote:<br class="">
<blockquote type="cite" class="">[...]<br class="">
 That's because the word you're trying to hyphenate is<br class="">
"Amsterdam-Buitenveldert", not "Amsterdam".  Compound words are by<br class="">
default hyphenated only at the hyphen in TeX.<br class="">
</blockquote>
<br class="">
\setbreakpoints[compound] works in the following sample:<br class="">
<br class="">
   \language[nl]<br class="">
   \setbreakpoints[compound]<br class="">
   \starttext<br class="">
   \hyphenatedword{Amsterdam--Buitenveldert}<br class="">
   \stoptext<br class="">
<br class="">
I don’t know whether it would make sense to use an en-dash for compound<br class="">
words in Dutch.<br class="">
<br class="">
I hope it helps now,<br class="">
<br class="">
<br class="">
Pablo<br class="">
</div>
</blockquote>
</div>
<br class="">
</div>
</body>
</html>