[NTG-context] outer floats on doublesided pages

R. Ermers r.ermers at hccnet.nl
Tue Sep 10 08:23:56 CEST 2013


Dear all,

I have problems with the placement of floats. I need them to be placed in the outer edge of the text, but Context puts them in the middle of the page. The outer, inner, outeredge, inneredge, commands do not work. Right and left do work.

Preferably the criterium option should also work, e.g. criterium=0.67.
A minimal test file is attached. Try it out with a dummy, or with cow picture, or with any other picture of your liking.

I updated my context installation today to a bèta version. The version is: 2013.08.30 02.05.

All help is welcome!
Many thanks in advance,

Robert

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\setuppapersize[A4][A4]

\setuppagenumbering[alternative=doublesided,location=footer]

\definefloat[edgefigure][figure]

\setupfloat
[edgefigure]
[leftmargindistance=-\outercombitotal,
 rightmargindistance=-\outercombitotal,
 default={outer,none,low,high}]

\setupcaption[edgefigure][number=no]

\useexternalfigure[cow][./cow.pdf]

\starttext

\startsection[title={insight},reference=insight]

\placeedgefigure[][]{}{\framed[frame=off]{\externalfigure[cow][scale=150]}}
When the first volume of Donald Knuth's The Art of Computer Programming was published in 1969, it was typeset using hot metal type set by a Monotype Corporation typecaster with a hot metal typesetting machine from the 19th century which produced a "good classic style" appreciated by Knuth. When the second edition of the second volume was published, in 1976, the whole book had to be typeset again because the Monotype technology had been largely replaced by photographic techniques, and the original fonts were no longer available.[4] When Knuth received the galley proofs of the new book on 30 March 1977, he found them awful.[5] Around that time, Knuth saw for the first time the output of a high-quality digital typesetting system, and became interested in digital typography. The disappointing galley proofs gave him the final motivation to solve the problem at hand once and for all by designing his own typesetting system. On 13 May 1977, he wrote a memo to himself describing the basic features of TeX.[6]

\placeedgefigure[][]{}{\framed[frame=off]{\externalfigure[cow][scale=150]}}
He planned to finish it on his sabbatical in 1978, but as it happened the language was not frozen until 1989, more than ten years later. Guy Steele happened to be at Stanford during the summer of 1978, when Knuth was developing his first version of TeX. When Steele returned to MIT that autumn, he rewrote TeX's I/O to run under the ITS operating system. The first version of TeX was written in the SAIL programming language to run on a PDP-10 under Stanford's WAITS operating system. For later versions of TeX, Knuth invented the concept of literate programming, a way of producing compilable source code and cross-linked documentation typeset in TeX from the same original file. The language used is called WEB and produces programs in DEC PDP-10 Pascal.


\placeedgefigure[][]{}{\framed[frame=off]{\externalfigure[cow][scale=150]}}
When the first volume of Donald Knuth's The Art of Computer Programming was published in 1969, it was typeset using hot metal type set by a Monotype Corporation typecaster with a hot metal typesetting machine from the 19th century which produced a "good classic style" appreciated by Knuth. When the second edition of the second volume was published, in 1976, the whole book had to be typeset again because the Monotype technology had been largely replaced by photographic techniques, and the original fonts were no longer available.[4] When Knuth received the galley proofs of the new book on 30 March 1977, he found them awful.[5] Around that time, Knuth saw for the first time the output of a high-quality digital typesetting system, and became interested in digital typography. The disappointing galley proofs gave him the final motivation to solve the problem at hand once and for all by designing his own typesetting system. On 13 May 1977, he wrote a memo to himself describing the basic features of TeX.[6]
He planned to finish it on his sabbatical in 1978, but as it happened the language was not frozen until 1989, more than ten years later. Guy Steele happened to be at Stanford during the summer of 1978, when Knuth was developing his first version of TeX. When Steele returned to MIT that autumn, he rewrote TeX's I/O to run under the ITS operating system. The first version of TeX was written in the SAIL programming language to run on a PDP-10 under Stanford's WAITS operating system. For later versions of TeX, Knuth invented the concept of literate programming, a way of producing compilable source code and cross-linked documentation typeset in TeX from the same original file. The language used is called WEB and produces programs in DEC PDP-10 Pascal.

\stopsection

\stoptext



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If your question is of interest to others as well, please add an entry to the Wiki!

maillist : ntg-context at ntg.nl / http://www.ntg.nl/mailman/listinfo/ntg-context
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archive  : http://foundry.supelec.fr/projects/contextrev/
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